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UK Fellow, Psychology, elected in 2012

Professor Oliver Braddick FBA

Visual perception and its development in early childhood; in particular, spatial, motion, binocular vision, and vision for action, and their underlying brain mechanisms in typical development and developmental disorders
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About this Fellow

Oliver Braddick gained his BA and PhD from Cambridge University, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Brown University, USA. He was a Lecturer and Reader in Experimental Psychology at Cambridge 1969-1993, followed by a chair at UCL 1993-2001 and Head of the Psychology Department 1998-2001. From 2001 he was Professor and Head of Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University and a Fellow of Magdalen College, where he is now an Emeritus Professor, with visiting appointments at UCL and University of California San Diego. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Psychology. His research is on the mechanisms of visual perception and their development in infancy and childhood, particularly spatial and motion vision. He is well known for proposing a specific mechanism for short-range visual motion (1974). In 1976 he established the Visual Development Unit with Janette Atkinson, initially in Cambridge and subsequently in UCL and Oxford. The Unit pioneered work on contrast sensitivity, binocularity, orientation and motion processing in infancy, on refractive screening of infants, and on dorsal stream vulnerability as a feature of extra-striate visual processing in developmental disorders. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Academia Europaea.

Website: http://www.neuroscience.ox.ac.uk/research-directory/a-e/oliver-braddick

Appointments

Current post

  • Emeritus Professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford

Publications

Development of human visual function Vision Research, 51, 1588-1609 2011

Normal and anomalous development of visual motion processing: motion coherence and ‘dorsal stream vulnerability’ Neuropsychologia, 41, 1769-1784 2003

Segmentation versus integration in visual motion processing Trends in Neurosciences 16: 263-268 1993

A short-range process in apparent motion Vision Research 14: 519-527 1974

Form and motion coherence activate independent, but not dorsal/ventral segregated, networks in the human brain Current Biology, 10: 731-734 2000

Cortical binocularity in infants Nature, 228; 363-365 1980

Other Psychology Fellows

Professor Chris Frith

The relationship between the mind and the brain; studies of perception, belief, will and consciousness in sickness and health with a special emphasis on interacting minds