Histories and futures of under-utilised crops ‘reimagined’

This project aims to understand historical social-cultural changes in relation to why indigenous crops became under-utilised and to construct with farming and food communities the possibilities for new innovative approaches to sustainable food production and consumption.
Project status
Ongoing
Departments
International

Project

The availability and utilisation of indigenous crops could improve food security, reduce hunger and support adaptation to climate change. Such crops are nutritious and tend to be more resilient to extremes in climate than what are seen globally as mainstream crops (for example, monocropping maize). While the scientific evidence for this is established, potentially valuable crops remain neglected, and their resource is under-utilised. The purpose of this research is to understand historical social-cultural changes in relation to why indigenous crops became under-utilised and to construct with farming and food communities the possibilities for new innovative approaches to sustainable food production and consumption. The project’s approach is to co-create knowledge that is grounded in local oral histories and extend these narratives and stories into the future. In doing so, the research can facilitate the movement of new conversations, new assumptions, new evaluations and new approaches into farming and food value chain practices.

Principal Investigator: Dr Lilian Korir, University of Lincoln

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