Disabled Refugee Students Included and Visible in Education: Challenges and Opportunities in Three African Countries

A project aiming to understand the educational inclusion and exclusion of disabled refugee students, particularly girls, in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.
Ongoing
International

Refugees flee crisis situations, but then experience new crises in settlement contexts. This affects access to and success in education. Refugee populations include disabled people who have been 'invisible' in policy and service provision. Girls are the most vulnerable in this group. Little is known about the challenges and opportunities disabled refugee students face, especially in the Global South which hosts most of the world's refugees.


This interdisciplinary project aims to understand the educational inclusion and exclusion of disabled refugee students, particularly girls, in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe – countries with different approaches to settlement. The project team aims to deliver evidence that will impact on policy and practice, such that these students become visible and included in education. This will benefit individuals, families and societies, and contribute to ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education for all.


Research team: Dr Elizabeth Walton, University of Nottingham; Dr Juliet Thondhlana, University of Nottingham; Dr Joanna McIntyre, University of Nottingham; Dr Roda Madziva, University of Nottingham; Dr Chamunogwa Nyoni, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe; Professor Nicole De-Wet Billings, University of the Witswatersrand, South Africa; Dr David Monk, Gulu University, Uganda

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