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UK Fellow, Law, elected in 2005

Professor Sandra Fredman FBA

Human Rights
Sandra Fredman profile picture

About this Fellow

Sandra Fredman is the Rhodes Professor of the Laws of the British Commonwealth and the USA at the University of Oxford, a Fellow of the British Academy. She was made a Queen's Council (honoris causa) in 2012. She is South African, a graduate of the University of the Witwatersrand and Oxford University. She has published widely in the fields of equality, labour law, and human rights. Her books include Human Rights Transformed (OUP 2008); Discrimination Law (OUP, 2nd ed 2011); Women and the Law (OUP, 1997); The State as Employer (Mansell, 1988) with Gillian Morris and Labour Law and Industrial Relations in Great Britain (2nd ed, Kluwer, 1992) with Bob Hepple. She edited Age as an Equality Issue (Hart, 2003) with Sarah Spencer,and Discrimination and Human Rights: the Case of Racism (OUP, 2001). In 2012, she founded the Oxford Human Rights Hub, of which she is the director.

Website: http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/profile/fredmans

Appointments

Current post

  • Professor of Law, University of Oxford; Fellow, Pembroke College, Oxford

Past Appointments

  • Leverhulme Major Research Fellow, Unknown Unknown, 2004 - 2007
  • Fellow, Exeter College University of Oxford, 1988
  • Lecturer in Law, University of Oxford, 1988
  • Professor of Law, University of Oxford, 2001
  • Professor of Law, University of Oxford, and Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, Exeter College University of Oxford, 1988 - 2013
  • Professor of Law, University of Oxford, and Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, Exeter College University of Oxford, 1988
  • , King's College London University of London, 1984 - 1988

Publications

'Foreign fads or fashions: the role of comparativism in human rights law' (2015) 64 International and Comparative Law Quarterly 631 2015

1970

'Reversing roles: bringing men into the frame' (2014) 10 International Journal of Law in Context 442 2014

1970

‘Emerging from the Shadows: Substantive equality and Article 14 ECHR’ (2016) Human Rights Law Review, 1–29 2016

1970

'From Dialogue to Deliberation: Human Rights Adjudication and Prisoners' Rights to Vote' [2013] Public Law 292 2013

1970

'Breaking the Mold: Equality as a Proactive Duty ' (2012) 60 American Journal of Comparative Law 263 2012

1970

The Potential and Limits of An Equal Rights Paradigm In Addressing Poverty (2011) 22 Stellenbosch Law Review 2011

1970

The Public Sector Equality Duty (2011) 40 Industrial Law Journal 405 2011

1970

New Horizons: Incorporating Socio-Economic Rights in a British Bill of Rights [2010] Public Law 297 2010

1970

Positive Duties and Socio-economic Disadvantage: Bringing Disadvantage onto the Equality Agenda (2010) European Human Rights Law Review 290 2010

1970

Engendering Socio-economic rights (2009) 25 South African Journal of Human Rights 410 2009

1970

Women and the Law 1997

1970

Discrimination Law (Clarendon Series (OUP , 2nd ed) 2011)

1970

Human Rights Transformed 2008

1970

From Deference to Democracy: the Role of Equality under the Human Rights Act 1998 Law Quarterly Review 2006

1970

The State as Employer: Labour Law in the Public Services 1989

1970

Labour Law and Industrial Relations in Great Britain 1st ed 1986, 2nd edn 1992

1970

Reforming equal pay laws Industrial Law Review 2008

1970

Redistribution and Recognition: reconciling inequalities South African Journal on Human Rights 2007

1970

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Professor Julia Black

The dynamics, effectiveness and legitimacy of public and private regulatory regimes at national, regional and global levels

Professor Christine Bell

The connections between constitutional law and international law forged through attempts to end violent conflict, with a focus on how these attempts affect constitution-making processes, peace agreements, and the development of international law itself