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Syrian Refugees in Jordan: the Challenge of Sustainable Development

This project provides evidence on the impact of hosting refugees in developing countries, highlighting both the challenges and the potential opportunities.

Forced displacement is a global challenge. The outbreak of the conflict in Syria in 2011 has displaced 4.7 million people to neighbouring countries. According to the 2015 Population Census of Jordan, Jordan is currently hosting 1.3 million Syrians, of whom 630,000 are registered as refugees with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The Syrian influx comes on top of an additional 1.6 million foreigners residing in Jordan. Compared to a total population of 6.6 million Jordanians in 2015, the non-national population of refugees and migrants have potentially increased Jordan’s population by about 45%, undoubtedly placing severe pressures on labour markets and public services. There is little rigorous evidence on the economic consequences of forced displacement for developing countries, who host 86% of the world’s refugees, partly due to the paucity of adequate data.

Using rigorous methodologies and rich new data sets, this project aims to provide better understanding of the effects of hosting refugees on Jordanian society and, particularly, on the country’s labour market and the access and quality of public services. The researchers will study the socio-economic impact for both Jordanians, Syrian refugees and other groups of immigrants, highlighting the effects on women, youth and children. The project will provide better understanding of the effects of hosting refugees on Jordanian society and, particularly, on the country’s labour market and the access and quality of public services.

The project focuses on the impact of the influx of Syrian refugees on:

  1. Labour Market Outcomes: such as types of employment, sectoral choice and wages;
  2. Public Services: access to housing and education;
  3. Women’s status: freedom of movement and female labour force participation.

Principal Investigator: Professor Jackline Wahba, University of Southampton

Supporting content

Project part of

Sustainable Development 2016 Programme

This programme funds researchers in the humanities and social sciences working on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and generating evidence on the challenges and opportunities faced in developing countries.

International

We foster international collaboration in the humanities and social sciences, and promote the sharing of international perspectives on global challenges.

Other projects in this programme

Making Light Work

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