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Professor Paul Hammond FBA

English Language and Literature Northern Europe France
Paul Hammond profile picture

About this Fellow

Paul Hammond was a Prize Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge 1978-82; he has subsequently taught at the University of Leeds, being appointed to a personal chair as Professor of Seventeenth-Century English Literature in 1996. His principal research interests are in seventeenth-century poetry and drama, particularly in Shakespeare, Milton, Dryden, and Racine.

Website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/site/custom_scripts/people_profile_details.php?profileID=1117

Appointments

Current post

  • Professor of Seventeenth-Century English Literature, University of Leeds

Past Appointments

  • Fellow, Trinity College University of Cambridge, 1978 - 1982
  • Lecturer in English, Senior Lecturer and Reader, University of Leeds, 1978 - 1996
  • Professor of Seventeenth-Century English Literature, University of Leeds, University of Leeds, 1996
  • Professor of Seventeenth-Century English Literature, University of Leeds, University of Leeds, 1996

Publications

Milton and the People 2014

1970

The strangeness of tragedy 2009

1970

Shakespeare's Sonnets: An original-spelling text 2012

1970

The poems of John Dryden (5 vols) 1995-2005

1970

Dryden and the traces of classical Rome 1999

1970

Figuring sex between men from Shakespeare to Rochester 2002

1970

Other Early Modern Languages and Literatures to 1830 Fellows

Professor John Barrell

English Language and Literature History of a specific country Britain in the 18th & 19th C. History of Art Theory of Painting Cultural Geography

Professor Nick Boyle

German literature and philosophy from 1700 to the present, particularly with reference to Goethe. Theological aspects of contemporary politics

Professor Brian Richardson

Italian language and literature; manuscript studies; historical studies of language and literature; medieval history; historical linguistics; southern Europe, Italy.

Professor Richard McCabe

Early modern literature in its historical and intellectual contexts, especially poetry and drama; Edmund Spenser's engagement with Gaelic Ireland, the dynamics of Tudor and Jacobean patronage, the aesthetics of Renaissance tragedy.