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Professor Daniel Miller FBA

Anthropology of Social Media and Digital Anthropology. Anthropological approaches to material culture including clothing and homes; the role of objects in relationships; the process of consumption and the study of commerce and value
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About this Fellow

Appointments: Professor of Material Culture, Department of Anthropology, University College London University College London (1995-) Principal publications: How the World Changed Social Media 2016. Social Media in an English Village 2016,. Stuff 2010 The Comfort of Things, 2008 A Theory of Shopping, 1998 Material Culture and Mass Consumption, 1987

Website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/people/academic_staff/d_miller

Appointments

Current post

  • Professor of Anthropology, University College London

Past Appointments

  • Professor of Material Culture, Department of Anthropology, University College London, 1995 - 2017
  • Professor of Anthropology, University College London, 2017

Publications

Material Culture and Mass Consumption 1987

A Theory of Shopping 1998

The Comfort of Things 2008

Other Anthropology and Geography Fellows

Professor Hastings Donnan

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Professor Stuart Elden

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Professor David Mosse

Historical anthropology of religion, social-political systems and livelihoods, especially with reference to Indian caste inequality and activism, religious pluralism (Hindu and Christian) and common property resources; the anthropology of knowledge, inst

Professor Richard Wrangham

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